Saturday, August 15, 2015

The luck of the draw ...

... to have the leisure to sing sad songs as the world turns.

10 comments:

  1. Ok, there seems to be a backstory here. But since you haven't elaborated I can only say how stunning this image is & your few words are taking me down a different path than it started down before reading them. :-) Both figures are so dynamic.

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  2. Thanks Sheila. I put together this piece as my reaction to the plight of all the increasing number of refugees in the world. How lucky so many of us are to observe from a place of safety.

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    1. I knew it had to be something specific. But it also could speak to many other situations, depending on the viewer's experience. Thanks for sharing the inspiration. Interesting use of that plum. I find I have quite a bit of it in my stash and also some paint that color but also find it hard to work into pieces to my satisfaction. It's helpful to see what you've done with it here.

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    2. I agree about different interpretations, and in general with my work that is what I want, so thanks.
      Colours are interesting. For me the plum colour here is derived from red: seeking attention, power, luck, blood. and purple/blue: regal/victor, cold, ....

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  3. Exciting movement suggesting dance to music so I'm surprised to read about the inspiration for it in your comment.

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    1. Interesting that perhaps you see dance as solely positive - ? As a great lover of contemporary dance I have seen great tragedy portrayed by dancers. The bold body behind the guitarist I had hoped would convey extreme emotion: perhaps the leap of victory, of power, - or equally an appeal for help, to be noticed, to be taken up as is a small child.

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  4. A very powerful piece, very dynamic. The comment gives it an added dimension. My first reaction to the figure behind the guitarist was of a leap of exaltation and joy, but having read your comment I can see how it could also be seen as an appeal for help. Very powerful.

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    1. Thank you, Eirene. I always try to achieve a sense of ambiguity in my work. Even though I aim for an immediate impact, I also try to put enough into the work that will stand looking at again and again.

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  5. Wonderfully vigorous and full of emotion, both positive and negative. When watching the refugees as they seek security and freedom, I am constantly struck by their desperation but also by their youth and vigor and so often by their extraordinary optimism despite all their difficulties. This piece depicts it all.

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