Friday, July 03, 2015

Intensity - tennis in hand

I love watching tennis, and at present the Wimbledon matches are a real treat.  But I cannot watch while doing nothing else - which is just as well, as I watch a lot!  So right now I'm getting through piles of hand stitching.
To hand at present is a piece I named Plunge pool, but which I've come to think of as Grexit? as somehow the turmoil in Greece over the economy, particularly this week has joined the turmoil I felt when I designed the image in 2010.
As ever, the image is a conjunction of elements which just came together the day we went to see the 2010 Serpentine Pavilion designed by Jean Nouvel.   That day we also went into the Serpentine Gallery where I was given permission to photograph one of the high windows.  I had nothing specific in mind, but the look of it appealed to me.
Then walking back to the car which was parked a few streets away I passed a piece of street furniture which I snapped.
Back home the next day I put these together with a photo of my first piece of backloom weaving made when I lived in the USA (I tried all sorts of craft making then, and it was there that art quilts first attracted me).
Somehow the window looked like a pool that needed a fish, and in those days also I was looking after my mother with no additional help, so the figure expresses my state.  Anyway, that's what I am stitching now, with a considerably cheerier demeanour, and it occurred to me that it is once more appropriate - for a current Greek drama.

10 comments:

  1. As always, fascinating to get an inside look at your design process. I doubt many except other artist would guess how many unrelated things discovered at different times magically come together in our creations often at a much later date. Well, mostly magically! And I'm also always fascinated by how much emotion your simple faceless figures project.

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  2. Thanks Sheila. Yes, I constantly astonish myself, still, with how odd little attractions and interests somehow coalesce into an idea for a piece of work. The pieces I like the best have always come to me that way - indeed, trying to work something deliberately nearly always comes a cropper with me.

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    1. Ha! Me too. And that has always made me feel a little inadequate. I think that is why I appreciate posts like this that show me I am not the odd one out because of the way my best work comes about. But perhaps this ability to see how random bits fit is as much or more of a talent than the way I think artsts are supposed to work. Or perhaps my insecurities come from my lack of formal training. At any rate, it is encouraging to find others with like starting points.

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    2. I so agree Sheila about the lack of self confidence arising from a lack of formal training. I have been encouraged, however by the number of artists whose work I admire who turn out to be self taught. Most of the time now, after years of insecurity about not having a degree from an art college, I just go with my own flow.
      You are right, though: it is good to read of others in similar boats.

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  3. I think that you should call it 'Grexit' as it encompasses the current situation perfectly.

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    1. Hi Jenny

      I am certainly thinking seriously about it. What is also ironic is that the thread I'm using is Gutermann - German, but made in Greece!

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  4. A very evocative design, expressing both your personal turmoil in the past and the situation in Greece at present. I really enjoy finding out about the process that leads to your designs - it's fascinating.

    As for the situation in Greece, the relief and jubilation I experienced on Sunday evening following the OXI vote is still there, but the anxiety about what is going to happen is, unfortunately, dominating, yet again.

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  5. Eirene, I'm afraid I've reached a point when I cannot articulate in words what I think and what I feel (not always the same) about the Greek situation. I continue to watch, listen, and read, and perhaps some work will emerge - although, in general the work is personal and only coincidentally political. But of course everything is political - !

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  6. Your process is always fascinating. This time it was particularly interesting to see how you combine such unrelated things to make such a satisfying whole ... and with such obvious assurance.
    The conversation about lack of formal training and lack of confidence always chimes with me. I feel I've missed out on so much and yet I enjoy the freedom of exploring what for me is new and novel - and having the choice about what I explore.

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  7. Thank you Margaret.
    I understand about enjoying the freedom to explore rather than going through some kind of directed programme. I spent a few years doing just that, but I must admit that now I do want to control the input I seek, and want to concentrate more on exploring output. So it is good to see your comment about 'obvious assurance'.

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