Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Logos do matter

I am in the third week of the online Archaeology of Portus course, and fascinated once more at what elements of detritus from ages past can tell us about the folks then.  And coupled with our ongoing downsizing exercise, I look around me and wonder what will be salvaged, in what state, and whether it will enlighten the examiners.
Last week on the course I learned that maker's stamps on bricks in Roman times are of vital importance now to archaeologists (image above from here).  I suspect that the Victorian times with their pride in stamping drain covers etc. will be a much more fertile source than today's plastic and electronic markers.

5 comments:

  1. What a lovely satisfying shape that maker's stamp is. I don't think a bar code will have quite the same impact 1000 years hence ... but who knows?

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  2. Oh, I love this! Reminds me of all the 'street furniture' in London that I photographed in 2009 and which later became a print series! Of course this image is much much older.

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  3. Marja-Leena, I remember your photographs and the resultant prints that you showed us. I like the continuation from the much earlier examples in history, and am sad that today's examples might not remain. What will there be to show of us?

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  4. This put me in mind of what was found during the continuing restoration of our old train station here in Sandpoint, ID (USA) built in the early 1900's. There were tiles on the walls, nothing special, but they needed to be removed to repair what was behind them and then put back in place. To everyone's surprise, each was stamped with a name on the back, including one stamped Tiffany. Their thinking is that there must have been some kind of fund raising involving getting the donor's name impressed on the back of the tile. But Tiffany? There's a story there, so far lost to time. This type of minutia is so fascinating to me and points out how quickly common information is forgotten and wild and unsubstantiated current speculation can become. But so fascinating - these clues to our past.

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