Monday, September 22, 2014

Something new

I very much enjoy the process of learning, of following my curiosity, and uncovering new questions to ask.  My previous career in publishing gave me constant opportunities to pursue such activity, but now for some time I have been relying on my reading - mostly, though not exclusively of art books.  I do miss that more general input, and so I decided to try an online course.
I heard about FutureLearn courses on the radio during a programme which was describing a collaboration between the BBC and FutureLearn.  I was not particularly interested in that particular course, but the idea of such courses intrigued me.  So I have signed up for courses on archaeology: the first, on Hadrian's Wall begins today.  The courses are free, and there is no pressure on how much or how little the participant does - that suits me fine.
Image above from here, where you can see more photos of the wall
I have also signed up for three other archaeology courses, all under water.  I shall see how I progress through the first course before I get too enthusiastic.
This does not mean that I am giving up the stitching nor the printing - I am simply exploring more divers inputs.

5 comments:

  1. Learning is always good. Diverse learning is even better!

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  2. Thanks for this Olga. I have registered and look forward to what they have to offer. Can't do much this coming autumn as I am fully booked up with lots of things, but it's a good thing to have for the future. Archaeology under water definitely fascinates...

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  3. Sheila and Eirene, in life now there is never an excuse for a dull moment!

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  4. How very interesting this looks - though, like Eirene I'm going to be quite busy enough this autumn but who knows when I might find more time to explore in another direction.

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  5. I look forward to hearing about your course Olga. I work part time at Wroxeter Roman City and am also creating some new artwork for Shrewsbury Museum based on the Roman artefacts from Wroxeter.
    Jacqui

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